Strona główna zdrowie Mild cognitive impairment and depression triples the risk of dementia

Mild cognitive impairment and depression triples the risk of dementia

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Mild cognitive impairment and depression triples the risk of dementia
Mild cognitive impairment and depression triples the risk of dementia

People diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment who have symptoms of depression. Low mood have a three-fold increase risk of developing dementia. According to a study by the Ace Alzheimer Center Barcelona (ACE) in Spain.

The study, publishe in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, has shown that those with positive biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease and who have symptoms of depression have a three-fold increase risk of their symptoms turning into dementia after two years compared to those who are not affecte by these two conditions.

The study, according to its authors, highlights the importance of also taking into consideration the behaviour of the person with cognitive impairment when predicting the risk of developing dementia.

Mild cognitive impairment and depression triples the risk of dementia

According to the head of Medical Psychology at ACE and principal investigator of the study, Sergi Valero, „this is the first time that scientific research has focused on the relationship between the simultaneous presence of positive biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease and neuropsychiatric symptoms”.

Valero recalled that a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment does not necessarily mean that dementia will develop. If these two other factors – the presence of biomarkers and neuropsychological symptoms such as depression or apathy – are present, the risk of developing dementia increases.

Mild cognitive impairment and depression triples the risk of dementia

The research has analysed a sample of 500 people. Who were followed for several years by a multidisciplinary team at ACE analysing the interaction of different neuropsychiatric symptoms.

According to the study, „while depression was key, apathy. Anxiety or irritability did not show a modulatory effect on the conversion of patients to dementia”.

„This is the first time that biochemical and behavioural factors have been taken into account simultaneously in the development of dementia, and the findings represent a step forward in identifying the patients most at risk of developing dementia, highlighting the need to also take into account the neuropsychiatric symptoms of our patients,” said Valero.

„It is essential to continue research in this line. Exploring people in even earlier stages of the disease and to monitor with greater precision the changes that occur over time. Both biochemical and behavioural. Trying to determine how these changes and this combination of risk factors of different. Natures act as predictors of the evolution that the person will experience in later years,” concluded the researcher.